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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys I have always used an 8 wt for steelhead but they never seem to give me much fight unless they are over 8 lbs so this year I was thinking maybe 6 wt, but is that too light? Think a 9 ft or 10 ft rod would be better? Also, same question applies to carp since I now love them!


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No, a 6wt 10' is great and perfect option for Ohio steels.

I use a 10' 5wt 95% of the time.
 

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I've caught and landed plenty of carp and steelhead on my 9'6" 6 wt. If you know how to play big fish using the butt of the rod and apply side pressure you won't have a problem 90% of the time. You will have issues if you get into a big fish though, I've had a couple steelhead that I couldn't turn before they ran me through a log jam or down into the fast water on my 6 wt but they were pretty monster fish.

Since then I've got a 10' 7 wt setup that handles the larger fish much better.
 

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El Fly Guy
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A 6wt with the ability to use the butt to fight a fish, along with a quality reel with a very smoothe drag (or the ability to uncannily palm a reel) and a decent amount of backing should be enough for everything this side of flatties.
 

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As long as it's 10 ft. then a 6 weight should be fine. When I spincast I use a 5 wt spin/fly combo rod (Trailmaster) and have never felt like I was underpowered.
 

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1 fish is a he!! of alot more than none.
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I think a 10' 7wt is perfect for our steelhead. I went from an 8wt to a 7wt Echo last year and landed my biggest fish ever plus a couple 15#ers. The rod never failed me and I have less break offs with the 7wt. I will tell you though, my 8wt was broken in the butt section on a 12#er that I landed in some heavy water on the Rocky 7 years ago. So, be careful in the heavy water, these fish can be powerful, especially with a 6wt.
 

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I think a 10' 7wt is perfect for our steelhead.
I think if you ran a poll you'd find that the 10ft 7wgt is the most commonly used flyrod on the Great Lake streams for Steelhead. I have an Orvis Clearwater 10 ft 7wgt that I really love for Steel, light enough to enjoy the fight but strong enough to turn them when needed.
 

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This thread is encouraging! I have been considering bringing my 6 wt 9' (my one and only fly rod) instead of a spinner to go for steelies this year. I was hesitant but now I think I'll do it. If there were 1 or 2 sure fire flies to tie for Ohio steelhead, what would they be?
 

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1 fish is a he!! of alot more than none.
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I rarely use egg patterns anymore. Mostly cause they catch too many females and it is just a personal preference. When you are confident, your fishing will show it, and you can use about anything you want. Eggs will still catch their share of fish, I just found I catch bigger fish on streamers. I learned with an egg and a nymph or streamer, but I just started to remove the egg especially in clear conditions. After a while, the egg seemed more for my benefit to know where the flies are in the water. I started fishing the streamers more like bass too and giving them some lively action which triggers a vicious strike. Eggs don't move that way naturally and I feel they hinder my presentation.

If I had only one fly, it would be a sculpin head with a wooly bugger body on great lakes steelhead. But when it is cold or fish are negative, I do more damage on size 10-14 nymphs. But I still like using the streamers cuz the strike is exciting.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Streamers are fun but they are not a great fly to start out with if you are new. To catch steelhead you need to know where they are and at what depth they are at. With an indicator tandem rig you can more easily figure out this depth than using different sink tips with streamers and fussing around the swing. I love streamers, don't get me wrong, but egg patterns work all season where as streamers are more fall, spring oriented.


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Streamers are fun but they are not a great fly to start out with if you are new. To catch steelhead you need to know where they are and at what depth they are at. With an indicator tandem rig you can more easily figure out this depth than using different sink tips with streamers and fussing around the swing. I love streamers, don't get me wrong, but egg patterns work all season where as streamers are more fall, spring oriented.


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So you are saying I probably won't have luck with wooly buggers?
 

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I have been doing some fly fishing for smallies in some creeks and rivers, with streamers such as buggers, clousers, and craw imitations. Still, I am intimidated by steelhead. It would be nice to not have to get a bunch of specialty flies :)
 

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In my vast experience of steelhead fishing :) (one week, several hook ups and one fish brought to hand) every one of my hits was on an olive wooly bugger or red and black egg sucking leech. This year I'm expanding my fly box a little but still taking the buggers and leeches.
 
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