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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was driving south between Columbus and Cincinnati this afternoon and saw something “not-quite right” looking under a 5th-wheeler camper up ahead of me. I got a bit closer and it looked like the passenger side tire(s) had something flopping around on the inside of the tires. I pulled out a pad of paper and sharpie…wrote “Trailer Tire Passenger Side” and got along side of the driver. He saw the message and we both pulled over at the next off-ramp, which was about another half mile away. After a quick greeting and discussion, the driver and I took a quick look underneath. The front tire of the tandem had a grapefruit-sized bulge on the sidewall. It wouldn’t have been much longer before it blew. He started getting things out to change the tire, first loosening the lug nuts on that tire. Then, he eventually got a mover’s blanket out to lay on, to set the jack underneath. Once he was under, he could now see that the other tire on that side also had a bulge about the same size. And, sure enough, the tires on the driver’s side were each starting to develop a bulge as well. He finished changing that one tire and made a few calls. There was a shop about 15 miles further down the highway that would be able to take care of him. So, he said he would drive the shoulder the rest of the way at a slow speed, and limp his way there. He said he was good, and thanked me repeatedly. That could have been a really bad situation for him and possibly others on the highway. It was strange, as he actually said that typically when one trailer tire goes on you, the rest aren’t far behind needing replacing.


I know others have posted here about performing tire / trailer maintenance at the beginning (or end) of the season. So, here’s a reminder to everyone to check things during the season as well. How often does any really look at the back side of their tires? His tires were about three years old and had a lot of miles on them, as he used that trailer to stay in while working out of town. Those tires looked brand new though. So, you never know. How often does anyone check the pressure in their spare tire? His was a bit low on pressure, but definitely usable.


I had a tire blow on my camper, a tandem axel 20’ camper on Route 21 between Akron and Massillon. That sucked. Damaged my fender wells, but I was able to change the tire and make it home without any issues. I ended up replacing all my tires as well, because I had heard the same statement about them all going bad back to back. I actually checked tire pressures that day before leaving the storage location and they looked fine. So, I knew he may have had a bad situation creeping up on him. I am glad I did what I did. I sure hope it all worked out for him.
 

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Great reminder, My tire guys say to replace all trailer tires every 4 to 5 years .Regardless of tread wear.Also helping that fellow out with his issues saved him a lot of damage to his unit.Nice move Lil,Rob
 

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I had old trailer tires and put 4 new goodyear endurance on my trailer a few weeks ago, it does give you piece of mind. My old tires had very few miles on them but were starting to crack from age and sitting. Who wants to start out their morning with flat tires.?
 

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I had to replace all 4 camper tires on a 3-1/2 year old unit.The tread was perfect but the side walls were cracked,or dry rotted , and one of them had a broken belt inside tire, you could actually see it in the tread, Not worth taking a chance.I now replace camper and boat trailers Tires every 4 years.Great topic guys nothing worse than a blowout on the road.
 
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I honestly don't trust "tailor tires" if I can put a quality car tires on that's what I go to ..... have had great service on my atv trailer.... now the smaller boat trailer I'm stuck at 12in
Very nice thing you did helping someone out , saving a potential disaster
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Why did you stop too? A lot of people nowadays would have thought it was a setup. Good job letting the guy know.
Legend killer.....to answer your question as to why I also stopped......

In today’s day and age, yes, it is risky to pull over to assist another driver in need. But, I had a few things working for me.

First, I saw that something bad was happening, or at least was going to possibly happen. And, I was the one who got him to pull over. So, with that, I wasn’t worried about pulling over to lend assistance if needed.

Second, I was driving my company van, which is plastered with our company name and phone number. That guy could have easily called that number and verified who I was before he even got out of his vehicle.

Third, when I got out of my van I did not approach him, but rather just yelled out to him what I was seeing. He took a physical look and waved me over…basically saying “Hey come look at this sh__!”.

So, with all that said, I wasn’t worried. Also, I know the feeling of having a trailer tire blow, and as mentioned earlier…it sucks. And, it would suck even more for someone not prepared well enough to deal with the situation. I was prepared when mine happened.

All kinds of scenarios where an extra set of hands makes a difference and “what if’s” that could pop up. What if…the lug nuts were seized…needed a pipe for leverage…I had that on my work truck, along with other tools, WD-40, etc. What if…the driver was physically unable to lift the tire off and on? What if the guy slipped and hurt himself and was unable to get to his cell phone?

Generally speaking, unless I see the situation happen, I am not going to stop to help. But, that is a topic for another thread.
 

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I honestly don't trust "tailor tires" if I can put a quality car tires on that's what I go to ..... have had great service on my atv trailer.... now the smaller boat trailer I'm stuck at 12in
Very nice thing you did helping someone out , saving a potential disaster
Had a buddy use car tires on his utility trailer we used to pull our quads and bikes for a long time without issue but I think the "expert" consensus is that trailer tires really should be used on trailers not car tires.
Trailer tires usually have a higher psi and thicker side walls that I'm sure do something that car tires do not provide maybe someone who knows more will chime in. I have always upgraded rating from whatever my trailer came with, usually C rated tires and go up to D. This has seemed to help and being overly on top of bearings. I had a blow out once that I believe was related to bearings getting too hot and therefore making the tire too hot and blowing, the higher rated tire in my mind can better compensate for such an incident at least I hope. I've run cheaper Carlisle and expensive Goodyear's and upgrading rating seems to have a bigger impact than the brand in my experience so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Saw a travel trailer yesterday with a blown tire on southbound I-71 north of Columbus as I was driving north.
 
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