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Beer Batter help

Discussion in 'Northeast Ohio Fishing Reports' started by marshal45, Jun 19, 2007.

  1. Okay, I am struggling with trying to use a beer batter on my fish. It seems that the batter falls off the fish while frying. Usually I mix flour with beer for a wet mix, then dip the fish in the mix and pan fry. This isnt working. Please let me know your tips for this. Thanks.
     
  2. Agent47

    Agent47 Trying to pull it in!!!!

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    the beer has to be flat, sit it out and dont forget the egg.
     

  3. I usually dip in the mix first, then the batter and into hot oil. Works for me! I fix the batter so that it is the consistency of thin pancake batter.
     
  4. Make sure the fish are dry first (no water). I usually double dip it myself, first in the batter then egg then batter again.
     
  5. The One

    The One Ret. 1SG U.S. Army

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    try lightly pressing the fillets between paper towels to remove excess moisture first.
     
  6. I used to do all that stuff....milk, flour or flavored powder, then egg, then secret seasoned bread crumbs......then I found a product at Cabella's where you just coat a wet fillet and drop in the frying pan. How easy! I experimented and did it both ways for the family to test and they all said that the Cabella's mix was the best. And since its soo easy, I've changed my way of cooking fish. There are four flavors, original, seasoned, cajun, and lemon. They are all very good. Had the lemon last night on some blue gill fillets.
     
  7. if it's too runny use more flour, the beer doesnt have to be flat
     
  8. I use the Golden Dipt beer batter from the grocery store. One can of beer per package of mix. No drying or flat beer required. Leaves a nice coat of batter and tastes great. I've used it a couple hundred times so I know it is pretty bullet proof. You just had to ask this question before lunch. Now I have to eat some pathetic fast food and dream of that beer battered bluegill. Good luck.
     
  9. I've never pan fried beer batter. I'm not sure what you mean but my definition of pan fried is a little bit of oil. I totally submerge the fish in oil so you may have better luck with this.
     
  10. Agent47

    Agent47 Trying to pull it in!!!!

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    Copy pasted from Bobby Flays Vegas Restaurant site. I like it. emphasizes FLAT BEER


    Introduction
    Batter-fried fish is one of life's great treats, but somewhat challenging to make at home. The recipe itself is simple; the difficult part is managing splattering hot oil and the smell of frying fish inside your home. Still, deep-frying is surprisingly easy to do on the outdoor grill.
    Instructions
    Difficulty: Moderately challenging
    Things You'll Need
    1 tsp. salt
    tongs
    2 quarts vegetable oils
    1 pound fish fillets
    1 12-ounce bottle beer
    1 cup all-purpose flour
    Steps
    1Step One Place the flour and salt in a mixing bowl.
    2Step Two Click to enlargeWhisk in the beer until the mixture is thick and creamy. You won't need all the beer, so you can drink the rest of it. ALWAYS make sure the beer is set out to go flat as carbonation solidifies sugars and flour and disperses the beers taste!!
    3Step Three Prepare your fish fillets by picking them over for any remaining bones or skin. Cut them into small pieces no thicker than 3/4 inch and no longer than 6 inches or so.
    4Step Four Pat them very dry with paper towels. This will reduce splattering.
    5Step Five Heat at least 2 inches - but preferably 4 or 5 inches - of oil in a large sturdy pot to 350 degrees F.
    6Step Six Dust the fish lightly in some extra flour and shake off the excess. This helps the batter adhere to the fish and reduces splattering.
    7Step Seven Click to enlargeDredge the fillet pieces one at a time in the batter, letting excess batter drip off.
    8Step Eight Click to enlargeSlowly submerge the pieces in the oil. This is a tricky process. If you drop in the battered fish too fast, sometimes the batter doesn't have time to seal and it sticks to the pan. Use metal tongs to submerge them slowly, or let them slide off a spatula.
    9Step Nine Fry the fillets two or three at a time; it's important not to crowd the pan.
    10Step Ten When the fish turns golden, remove the fillets and drain well on a generous amount of clean paper towels.
    Tips & Warnings
    You can fry just about any white-fleshed fish in this manner. Cod is the perennial favorite, as is the group of fish that pass for cod in many markets (such as tomcod and pollack). Halibut, snapper, whiting, flounder and catfish also fry well. Darker-fleshed fish such as salmon can be fried, but their oily flesh is better suited to other cooking methods.
    For a heavier batter, beat an egg in along with the beer.
    Try cooking this dish outdoors on a grill whose heat can be regulated. The smell of frying food won't permeate your home, and the splattering oil is less of an issue. Be very careful not to move the pot once the oil has been heated, though.
    See the Related eHow "How to Make French Fries" if you want to make fish and chips. French fries are fried twice: fry them once before making the fish, then fry the precooked fries again with the fish.
    Always be careful when working with hot oil. Work in slow, careful, deliberate motions and don't let anyone distract you.
    Never move the oil until it is completely cool.
    All chefs should adhere to the 450 degree rule on our stoves to prevent flashover from the oil.
     
  11. You are all great. Thank you so much for taking the time to respond. Very helpful. Now I just have to learn how to catch fish in order to try these recipes,lol.
     
  12. Fishpro

    Fishpro Northcoast Madman

    Try this, its better than any beer batter, I think beer batters holds in too much oil. Take some eggs and some milk and mix it togeteher until the yolks are mixed well with the milk. In another bowl, add Drakes mix or flour, salt, pepper, garlic powder and whatever spices you might like and mix them together well. Put an inch of oil in a large frying pan and heat it until a drop of the egg and milk mixtures sizzles as soon as it hits it. Take your fillet and dip it in the egg mix, then to the dry mix, and make sure its completely covered with dry mix. Carefully drop that into the hot oil until one side is golden brown and turn the fish over and cook until the opposite side is brown. Bring them out of the oil onto a paper towel lined plate to cool, open a cold one and enjoy with your favorite side dish. You won't want a beer batter ever again!:D
     
  13. Hetfieldinn

    Hetfieldinn Staff Member

    Wet batters don't like sticking to wet fillets. Dust your fillets with cornstarch or flour first, then drop them in the beer batter, then the oil.

    The oil should be between 360-370 degrees.
     
  14. i read something that if you wanted the coatings to stick---dip in egg/milk and then coat with flour then put it in the refridgerator for about 5 min ---repeat the egg/milk dip and then whatever else---it makes a glue (wallpaper paste)---ive coated fish with all sorts of things like oatmeal and crushed potato chips-----i never had beer and bisquick come off in a 1 dip process
     
  15. fugarwi7

    fugarwi7 Lumberjack

    Marshal45, I agree with Het on this one..this is the simple answer to the problem...just add this step to your process and it will work everytime!


    Quote by joerugz:
    "I used to do all that stuff....milk, flour or flavored powder, then egg, then secret seasoned bread crumbs......then I found a product at Cabella's where you just coat a wet fillet and drop in the frying pan. How easy! I experimented and did it both ways for the family to test and they all said that the Cabella's mix was the best. And since its soo easy, I've changed my way of cooking fish. There are four flavors, original, seasoned, cajun, and lemon. They are all very good. Had the lemon last night on some blue gill fillets."

    joerugz...this sounds like "Shorelunch" products, which I use often...really easy to use and taste great!!! (Okay, less filling too!)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2015
  16. Sammonator

    Sammonator Fish when I can...

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    I really believe that the issue is not so much the batter, but rather the pan. For true pan fried it's probably better going with a breadcrumb/cornmeal approach where you won't need to totally submerge the fillets in oil. For a beer batter, however, you'll need enough oil to allow the fillets to "float" once they fry for a while. Also, I suspect you might be trying to pan fry in a "non-stick"/cast iron skillet. I believe you'll have greater success using a treated pan for beer batter! Hope this helps-
     
  17. One other one I use that I haven't seen here is chuck wagon onion ring batter. That with a little bit of emeril's seasoning and some great lakes Edmund Fitzgerald porter makes a good batter. I also have to add that while veggie oil works I would really recommend peanut oil for deep frying, adds a nice flavor and has a higher smoking point. That's my 2 cents for what it's worth.
     
  18. misfit

    misfit MOD SQUAD

    lots of good tips.
    as mentioned,batter needs a dry surface to "stick" better,and is much better suited to deep frying than pan frying.in a pan,the batter will run off because the fillet is not surrounded by oil.deep frying instantly begins too cook it all around.breading works great for either method,but much better than batters for pan frying.peanut oil is tops for deep frying,but canola oil works well too,and is basically tasteless so it doesn't detract from flavor of the fish.for pan frying,i use only a 50/50 mix of butter/crisco or butter flavored crisco.
     
  19. I've done it "dry" like shore lunch and wet with beer as a batter.

    FWIW - I like dry myself. I mix my own shore lunch type product, my own seasonings and pancake mix - I use the pre-mixed pacake mix where you just add water.

    This also works if you want a batter. I DON"T use flat beer - active fizzy beer gives it a lighter airy coating. I've seen people use sparkling water that don't like beer.

    For a wet batter you MUST coat first with a dry substance. Either the batter mix, flour, cornstarch.

    Pan - deep fryer OR a pan either work the same - keep the oil at 375 - don't overload it.

    Done on everything from a grill, propane fish cooker, wood burner in Canada, open fire for shore lunch...

    Personal favorite is my dry mix, I dampen the fillet if needed, dredge in mix, let set a few (usually just as long as it takes to do the batch) and do it a 2nd time. this leaves the coating thick enough, but not too thick.

    One can easily do this in a baggie for shore lunch.

    I used to use the shore lunch type stuff. About 10 years ago at a show I talked to Gary Roach. He was selling his product. Had time to find out how he did it and stole the ideas from him. BTW - his beer batter used fizzy beer :)

    If you ever make your own seasoning - the one secret spice seems to be turmeric. Any combo of onion, garlic, ala Emeril's Bam will work, but turmeric was the one that seemed to match shore lunch.
     
  20. Golden dipt and a cup of guiness............there's no better way to do it.