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Bee attack on the Cuyahoga

Discussion in 'Northeast Ohio Fishing Reports' started by MiCkFly, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. I saw a woman taken out on stretcher today after she and her family were attacked by bees in the Cascade Valley Metro Park. The rescuers (don't recall if they were paramedics or firemen) were getting stung too. This all happened on the Oxbow Overlook trail on the west side of the river. The family stopped me in the parking lot where the trail originates and warned me not to go down to the river. I hope the woman is doing okay.
    I caught 3 SMB, 2 on a zonker minnow and 1 on an olive woolybugger. Also met a fellow flyfisherman who did well with hare's ear nymphs. The water was up but clear, nice stretch of river.
     
  2. freyedknot

    freyedknot useless poster

    back in the 70's at sunny lake i heard some bees???? we were in a boat in the middle of the lake ,but could not see any bees . about a minute later a flock of about 10,000 flew right by us,but not close to us. it was a sight to see for sure. glad they missed us or we would have had to jump in the water.
     

  3. Agent47

    Agent47 Trying to pull it in!!!!

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    Anyone know if the Killers are up this far ?
     
  4. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    I don't know if the killers have made it this far yet but very possible. I was fishing Lake Marion in SC and we saw two guys swinging wildly in there boat and finally jumped in. We went to check it out and see if they were ok or had just taken some halucinagins. Turns out they were being attacked by bees. I guess one of these geniuses saw the nest and thought it would be funny hit it with his jig and pig. Not a good idea. The nest had a big hole in it and some very pissed off bees all around it. This was back in 1984 so most likely not killer bees but just plain old pissed off bees. S
     
  5. misfit

    misfit MOD SQUAD

    seems a little late,but it could just be swarming season.when the weather warms,the hives will split once they get so big.the old queen will leave,taking half the colony to look for a new home.they'll hang together on limbs,etc till they find that new place.i've seen it several times,and it is kinda wierd getting buzzed by 10-20,000 bees:eek:
     
  6. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    I just remembered. A while back while getting the mail I was swarmed by a rather nasty looking be. It was brown and dark yellow rather than the typical black and yellow. They were coming at me from all direction but there were maybe only 20-30bees and I did not get stung I ran back to the house and ducked in the sliding glass door. These be were actually ramming into the glass trying to get at me. It was really wild. The whole incident lasted about 15 minutes. Very aggressive. I had posted this on the site and somebody said they may have been on the move looking for a new nesting area. I still have not seen another be like these however. S
     
  7. Agent47

    Agent47 Trying to pull it in!!!!

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    On Discovery channel a month or so ago I watched a episode about a Bee called the Japanese hornet that grows 3 to 5 inches. It kills little bees I guess and only 1 group type destroys the recon bee that searches for hives by trapping it , they all then fan there wings up to 182 degrees which fries it.However this is NOT supposed to be here in the U.S . Well my family went to Sandcastle water park in Pittsburgh 2 weeks ago when I saw this HUGE hornet buzzing the trash can, I asked the park manager what the hell..he stated it is a Japanese Hornet... I hope not as our honey bees are CRUCIAL and I dont want to see em destroyed. Thats a freaky sight to watch that monster buz around.
     
  8. Sand hornets get very large also. As far as I know, they seldom bother you.
     
  9. Agent47

    Agent47 Trying to pull it in!!!!

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    Nahh M, Sand Hornets get to be around 1 and a 1/2, this thing had a green abdomen and was about 4 inches.
     
  10. Good grief that's a big bee. Certainly no sand hornet.
     
  11. "killer" bees are actually African bees and cannot survive the cold temps this far north. They do actually breed with other European races of honeybees and pass on their violent characteristics. A killer bee sting is the same as a normal (one of the European species), but killer bees attack in numbers, much like piranha.

    When a honeybee hive swarms, it is because the hive became so large that the workers can no longer smell the queen, or she is getting old and not laying enough eggs. The workers and drones that do swarm with the old queen, gorge themselves with honey before leaving. Because of this, the gorged workers are physically unable to bend their abdomen enough to sting. Drones do not have stingers, so only a few in a swarm can actually sting.

    Hornets and yellowjackets are usually the culprits responsible for attacks on people.
     
  12. No luckily there still stuck in the south it's still to cool here in the summers to support them, but when I lived in Tx. I saw swarms of them a few times my fishing buddy said one time when we went fishing if you hear buzzing and think it's bee's coming don't think.... Jump in the lake! luckily I never saw them on the water but seeing a swarm is a very neat thing to see..