Any roto-molders out there

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by sevenx, Nov 28, 2007.

  1. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    Hey guys,
    I am looking to build a custom molded boat and have been looking for roto molders, thought I would throw it out here and see what shakes out.
    Thanks S
     
  2. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    Bump..........
     

  3. We don’t do rotational molding, but I might be able to locate one in Ohio. What do you plan to mold it out of? What size are you thinking? Have you looked at the price of tooling that you will need? I’m guessing it will be very cost prohibitive.
     
  4. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    I have searched through Plastic News and a friend who makes plastic barrells. It is very cost prohibitive at this point. For a mold to mock one up the tooling cost is around $10,000, I certenly cant afford that. The boat would be simular to a kayak format but not used like a kayak. I don't think I can get this done affordabely so I am looking for options. When the design patten is complete I will share more details. Thanks M.Magis for the reply.S
     
  5. willy

    willy no boat

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    I'm curious because there are dozens of other construction methods for watercraft building, especially for the do it yourselfer. If you goggle it you will find tons of info out there on the subject. I'm sort of a "shadetree do it myselfer" myself so I have to wonder why you would limit your question to one method. If you post more details on what it is you want to do then maybe others would be able to give more opinions, help and suggestions.
     
  6. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    Willy, I was looking to roto mold to get the shape I want and also from a durability stand point I think the plastic compounds would be the best. This is a kayak SOT design used in tadem. Between 12 and 14 feet in length. It is being designed for the LMR which has a lot of construction debree, shallow water and sharp, jagged rock. Wood, fiberglass or other might be easily damaged and costly to repare. If you have other materials that you know of that would be better for this application I am certenly open and appreciate any suggestions. Thanks S
     
  7. willy

    willy no boat

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    sounds alot like the concept i've been kicking around for the last several years lol. My point is that you can make a scale model mock up out of cardboard or foam or anything, and with home building methods after you have your design down and refined make a full size prototype to test it out (balance, functionality etc). I would suggest you check into using fiberglass, graphite or kelvar and use vacume bagging, if/when I get that far thats probably the way I will go. there are several different methods of doing that as well. the one that seems best to me is a "dry layup" where you only wet your cloth enough to hold it on your mold then bag it and have the vacume suck the resin into the cloth to fully saturate it as well as pull the excess out. There is a reason a graphite or kelvar yak or canoe can cost several grand and you can get a rotomold one at dicks for a few hundred, plastic is really heavy for its strength. I dont know if your thinking of a one-off design for yourself or testing a marketing idea but either way, you can make a whole lot of prototypes that way for a whole lot less then $10k for a single roto-mold jig. Now with that said I haven't done it yet myself but i have done quite a bit of research on it so take it for what its worth and good luck!
     
  8. freyedknot

    freyedknot useless poster

    a lot of the waqterfowlers are carving foam insulation and adding wood for transoms and the cockpit area,then covering it with cloth and resin. it is about half the price of a new factory built boat and lightweight.you can make a nice boat for 1 or 2 men for $300.00
     
  9. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    Thanks guys, Willy thanks for the other options, I will look futher into it. I am at this point looking to build the boat for a guide boat on the LMR and will be considering selling the concept or manufacturing it my self if I can get connected with the right folks. I still have some research to do for sure and the info is a great help. Freyed, the foam thing is one we have been kicking around as well as my partner in this is also a waterfowler and has seen the same thing you spoke of. Do you guys think using wood in the construction would actually be lighter than the other methods. I really appreciate the info guys, Willy maybe I should hire you as consultant or vice versa maybe between the two of us we can design the ultimate river fishing craft and retire to fish all day;);) S
     
  10. willy

    willy no boat

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    retire and go fishin??? i'm in... 8)
    If its a one-off for your own use or a prototype then wood is an option but other than that senario I would'nt even consider it, composites are the only way to go. I've never been to the LMR so I dont know about the conditions there but they make white water and touring yaks (kelvar composites) that weight less than my squeezbox's thong that you can beat with a claw hammer and not put a hole in it. It's all a trade off in the end just like the design of the craft itself really, and it sounds like you have a very specific use in mind which means a very limited market if thats the direction your thinking. Now that Freyed kNut let the cat outta the bag - thanks pal (just kidding) I guess I can tell you the method I've decided on. build it out of foam and vacume bag it with composite materials, most likely carbon fiber with kelvar reinforcement in high wear areas (carbon is stronger and kelvar is tougher). The foam core which is light and very ridged yet brittle forms the core and the composite forms the tough outter shell, and in our senario the core which stays in the finished product gives floatation as well. Then after we do functional tests with the prototype and tweak it out we can go the manufacturing route and get some tooling done then use injection molding for the foam cores to speed production and ...
    Hey did you put my consulting check it the mail yet???
     
  11. sevenx

    sevenx "I sat by the river" N.Mc

    THe checks in the mail......Thanks for tips guys I am thinking of doing a scale model to get the shapes I want then tranfer those demention to the foam core. Though the boat would have a specific river and purpose in mind it could be used any where and will able to handel some white water, maybe 3s or 4s but no likely to be a real big water boat. S
     
  12. willy

    willy no boat

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    ahhh grasshopper, there in lies another added benefit of the foam core -the entire craft is a flotation device -tiger shark bites your transome off? no problemo 8)
    There are peeps that go yaking miles out in the big blue oceans and catch fishys bigger than their SOT yaks, crazy maybe but they do it. I think the direction of the scale models is a great idea, test the waters so to speak and refine your designs. Not to deter you in the least but if you still leaning toward marketing your ideas you better have some very dEEp pockets as well as lots of time, if your serious the required marketing alone will cost at least ten fold of what the production will and most likely a whole lot more.
    Good luck to you, even if you only end up with your ultimate boat (which will be my case if i ever get to that point) it will still be worthwhile in my opinion.