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An Interesting Read

Discussion in 'Catfish Discussion' started by DavidWS10, Jun 11, 2005.

  1. DavidWS10

    DavidWS10 Bankless Boat Trash

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    One of my coworkers had this magazine at work yesterday and I found this article very interesting. If it's not a lot of smoke and mirrors, it's got me believing that Clyde, Jim, and the others who have devoted so much time to ending the commerical raping of our fisheries, are being noticed and attitude changes are happening. Good work, guys!!!

    http://www.kentuckygameandfish.com/fishing/catfish-fishing/KY_0605_02/
     
  2. mrfishohio

    mrfishohio Recovering Fishaholic

    OHIO RIVER
    Another fantastic location that is accessible for many Kentuckians is the Ohio River. Bordering much of the state, the river offers excellent catfishing throughout, with the best action taking place below major dams. Flatheads can be found from Ashland to Cairo and channel catfish may be found most anywhere in the river.

    Ohio River biologist Doug Henley said the river is also very good for blue catfish up to about Cincinnati. After that, the fishery for blues "starts to dwindle," according to Henley. "There are not as many and they're not as big."

    Consequently, in August 1999, Bruce W. Midkiff found the blue catfish population in fine shape as he landed the new state record at 104 pounds. The fish was caught in the tailwaters below Cannelton Dam. The catch also qualified as a new world record for line-class catch-and-release.

    The Ohio River also just recently yielded the state record for channel catfish. On May 26, 2004, Kyle Estep pulled in the 32-pound record fish. The catch surpassed the previous record by nearly 4 pounds!

    Henley and others at the KDFWR are beginning to study catfish in the river more closely. "We want to get a better idea of what shape the fishery is in regarding size, length, weight, age and growth rate."

    The biologists are concerned they don't know enough about reproduction and growth rates, and have already determined that catfish in the river grow slower than what they previously believed.
    The catfish fishery is becoming much more of a challenge for the KDFWR. There is beginning to be a little friction between the different groups of catfish anglers using the river and the department needs more information in order to better manage the resource and keep everyone happy. The river is utilized by casual weekend anglers, serious sport and tournament anglers, as well as commercial anglers looking to sell their catch.

    Sampling did not yield a lot of big fish, but it did show a wide range of age groups. Channel cats were caught to near 30 inches and one blue was sampled at 36 1/2 inches. Age structure was sampled up to 16 years. So far, studies indicate the fishery in the river is doing well for all species of catfish.


    There's your Cause & Effect...plain to me anyway... :rolleyes:
     

  3. mrfishohio

    mrfishohio Recovering Fishaholic

    They hold the fate of the Ohio River trophy cats in their hands. If they mirror TN regulations it might turn into a "go to" destination like the James River is for bluecats, like Erie is for walleyes. :D
     
  4. mrfishohio

    mrfishohio Recovering Fishaholic

    Here's a little piece of info...they determined the age of the fish...from Dewey Lake.

    Betty Perry, a local angler who bank-fishes Dewey frequently, caught a very nice flathead just recently in the fall of 2004. The fish weighed 42 pounds and measured an impressive 44 inches long. Frey's office determined the fish to be 16.5 years old.
     
  5. DavidWS10

    DavidWS10 Bankless Boat Trash

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    When I posted the link to this article, I wasn't intending for it to be construed that I believe that KY is actually doing anything about the catfish fishery in the Ohio River. Rather, I intended for it to be brought out that even KY is recognizing the sport fishing impact of catfishing. Also, I truly disagree that the Ohio River catfishery is doing well. All of us who fish the river have seen a decline in not only the size of the fish we catch, but in the numbers being caught as well. If something isn't done about it, the commercial raping of the River is going to kill it.
     
  6. flathunter

    flathunter Mellons mentor

    As long as the demand is there, the commercial netters will continue..And the demand is paylakes..More and more paylakes are sprouting up every year..I think Ohio has more than any other state..I got into an argument with a guy at work about that...He fishes paylakes for Blues...He said he cant afford a big boat to go to the ohio river for them, so they should be made available to everyone regardless of income via paylakes..I dont own a boat, and I sure dont agree with that.
     
  7. mrfishohio

    mrfishohio Recovering Fishaholic

    They are studying the river. One of their replies to me was there was no data to support what I was telling him...declining numbers of big fish. My "proof" was that almost all the OH River catfish guides have quit do to poor results. Also my experiance & the experiance of others who fish it.

    So that's a start, have to make a start & they are looking into it.
    Now this next part (reading between the lines) shows me the squeaky wheel gets noticed. If enough people email them and say they noticed reduced large cats and ask them why, is it because of all the netters we see?? Maybe they will study thiose too. I believe the netter have to record how many pounds of fish they remove too.

    So it's a start, that's a good thing. Maybe they will see that they could make the river profitable like Lake Cumberland is. It could be a resort area...the whole length of the river. Have some state parks, ramp fees, camping, non-res licenses, guide licenses. Might be more advantagous than allowing commercial fishing there. They could leave the rest of the state alone, and even the river, too. Other than enact a no catfish over 34" by commercial anglers & only one by sport anglers. ;)
    That could bring many jobs and revenue into the bordering states. KY holds the key, KY has to change the commercial practices in the OH River. Doesn't have to end them, just alter them :)