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? about fuel tank grounding

Discussion in 'Boats and Motors' started by Alwsfishin, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. Alwsfishin

    Alwsfishin '73 24' Stamas

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    I gounded the fuel tank intake to the tank by tucking a wire under both ends of the rubber hose connecting the two. Then I did the same to the lower end on the breather hose, and ran that wire to the neg. side of the panel which is run to the neg. side of the battery. I thought of running it to the motor instead I didn't think it would matter.

    Is this a correct way to ground a tank in a wood boat?

    Any and all responds are appreciated !!
     
  2. No expert here, just a thought. I would not do any grounding.

    I have an aluminum boat and they specifically say do not use the boat frame for ground. My thinking is that if the hot side ever touched the metal, a spark could cause serious trouble.

    The same with a wood boat, if the hot side of your battery every touched your ground wires, it could set things off.

    I think the best choice would be to make sure any static electricity be discharged away from your fuel or motor area.

    ...
     

  3. Alwsfishin

    Alwsfishin '73 24' Stamas

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    Thats what I'm attempting to do, eliminate the chance of a spark when inserting the nozzle to fuelup. When fueling portable metal tanks they should be placed on the ground for this same reason. Thanks for the reply Reel.
     
  4. Alwsfishin

    Alwsfishin '73 24' Stamas

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    CUSTOM MARINE TANKS LLC
    This tank has been Coast Guard certified and tested at
    our factory. Any modification to this tank is prohibited
    as it will void the certification. Be sure to ground
    tank to grounding lug or negative on the battery....
     
  5. I personally still would not ground.

    It seems to me that the larger the metal item(s), the greater the static spark.

    I have 2 separate batterys. Both + terminals are exposed wing nuts. I charge both after extended use. With 80 to 160 cranking amps I would hate to think about the fireworks a dead short might cause. I have seen screwdrivers melted with less current.

    The chances of a spark occuring when filling the fuel tank is less than that of filling an automobile or a lawn mower gas tank.

    Please note, this is just my personal thinking, this is too sophisticated of a subject for a layman, perhap a real expert will chime in.

    ...
     
  6. Alwsfishin

    Alwsfishin '73 24' Stamas

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    I did a search on grounding marine fuel tanks......believe me I'm not playing "I told you so".........I just thought I'd share this info, when your dealing with gasoline vapor one mistake could be your last....

    Gasoline, Static Electricity And Fires

    Gasoline has a low electrical conductivity-- it does not conduct electricity very well. As a result, a charge of static electricity builds up on gasoline as it flows through a pipe or hose and this charge takes several seconds to several minutes to dissipate after the gasoline has reached a tank or container. If this charge discharges as a spark from a tank or container to the grounded metal nozzle of the gasoline dispenser hose, it may ignite the gasoline. Ignition requires that the spark occur near the tank opening where the gasoline vapor is in the flammable range. A spark discharge directly from the surface of the gasoline to the grounded nozzle also is possible. Normally, this will not result in ignition because the concentration of gasoline vapor near the liquid is above the flammable limit.

    Theory and experience suggest that the condition most likely to lead to a spark discharge is filling a metal container or tank that is insulated from ground, i.e., one which is ungrounded. This is the situation that exists when a metal container is placed on a plastic bedliner.

    Most Hazardous Ungrounded metal container
    Less Hazardous Non-conducting container
    (e.g., plastic container)
    Least Hazardous Grounded metal container
     
  7. Just for the sake of more discussion, since you said any responds appreciated, I'll get a little goofy here.

    The following would be "most hazardous":
    My motorcycle, rubber tires.
    My lawnmower, plastic tires.
    My car, rubber tires.
    My boat tank, ungrounded

    To be safe, per the "National Electrical Code" you should probably drive an 8' metal rod in the ground before filling from a grounded fuel source.

    Even if you ground a metal fuel tank to the negative battery connection, there is still no electrical route to surface ground. Including boat on a trailer or in the water.

    The tank manufacturing people want to cover there butts, so if you blow things up from a ground wire touching the battery "+" they can say "not our fault".

    My daughter-in-law is the most static electrically charged person I know. Most of the time you can get a jolt just brushing by her. Could be the silk clothes ? She grounds herself all the time, to discharge the build up.

    I still ain't changin my reckless ways.

    If this still bothers you, try this. Continue holding the metal dispensing hose filler against your metal tank rim. Then the static build up goes to the grounded fill source. Assuming it is properly grounded.

    I think the aircraft people connect a wire to the wing before filling.

    ...
     
  8. Here's how the factory (Alumacraft) rigged mine. There is a ground wire run from the metal neck of the fuel fill along side the fill hose to the negative terminal of the fuel tank sending unit. What this does is run the ground from the fuel fill back to the ground of the fuel guage and thus back the the negative side of the battery.

    Barry
     
  9. Alwsfishin

    Alwsfishin '73 24' Stamas

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    The following would be "most hazardous":
    My motorcycle, rubber tires.
    My lawnmower, plastic tires.
    My car, rubber tires.
    My boat tank, ungrounded


    :D


    Placing a container on the ground makes it easier for electrical charge to escape. Cement or dirt are better conductors of electricity than asphalt and, therefore, better grounding surfaces. While vehicles that are driven to a service station may not appear to be grounded, they are. Tires are good enough conductors to allow electrical charge to escape to ground.
     
  10. Alwsfishin

    Alwsfishin '73 24' Stamas

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    I here by close this thread since it has come to a dead end........ :p ;)
     
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