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ShakeDown
04-21-2004, 06:33 PM
Wind from the east, is fishing the least? When to fish during the winds of Erie.
By Dave Adams (http://www.landbigfish.com/profiles/default.cfm?ID=17)



Is "Wind from the east, fishing's the least" on Lake Erie?

I can recall few days that I had good fishing with a (constant) east wind. What I watch for, however, is the origin of the east wind. Is it constant blow from a low pressure or an approaching high pressure?

Each weather system wind will create a different approach to fishing as well as what to expect for boating conditions.

An east wind from an approaching high pressure isn`t bad, providing the weather front will have Lake Erie centered in the high. High pressure systems always rotate clockwise and soon after the east (mostly northeast) wind ends, it will be good for fishing and boating.

The other east wind is the top of a low pressure system (they always turn counter clockwise), which will wipe out fishing for days and create a constant east wind. The same is true for the lower part of a high pressure; it will blow from the east for days and shut down the fishing. A quick glance at a weather map such as on www.weather.com will help in planning a fishing trip.

First, notice the location of weather fronts.

<CENTER>http://www.landbigfish.com/images/articles/da-windserie1.jpg
Photo courtesy of the Weather Channel</CENTER>

The H is the center of a high pressure area, and the air movement is caused by the barometric pressure, which is higher there than at surrounding places. The force of this pressure causes air to move out and away from the high pressure center. Because of the Earth’s rotation, the flow turns to the right in the northern hemisphere.

The L is the center of a low pressure. Because of the pressure difference and Earth’s rotation, air will spiral into the low pressure center. Normally, low pressure is associated with bad weather. According to meteorologists, they will form along the boundaries separating air masses of different temperature and are generally found under the jet stream.

When viewing a weather map, note the location and distance of the white lines around the weather systems. These are the isobar lines.

<CENTER>http://www.landbigfish.com/images/articles/da-windserie2.jpg
For a day of fishing on Lake Erie, this map is not the best, but it is fishable. For example, the isobar lines are spaced far apart, indicating low winds from the east, then switching to southeast.</CENTER>

<CENTER>http://www.landbigfish.com/images/articles/da-windserie3.jpg
If the lines are close together, expect higher winds speeds. If Lake Erie was centered on this map, expect east winds up to 25 knots.</CENTER>

For a day of fishing on Lake Erie, this map is not the best, but it is fishable. For example, the isobar lines are spaced far apart, indicating low winds from the east, then switching to southeast.

If the lines are close together, expect higher winds speeds. If Lake Erie was centered on this map, expect east winds up to 25 knots.

The direction of the jet stream can be used to predict which way the low pressure area will travel as well as predicting the movement a high pressure. On the map below, a high pressure system is pushed in our area - as indicated by the trough in the jet stream - while a low pressure system is pushed of the coast, near the top of Florida. The result is fair weather in the northeast United States for a day or two.

<CENTER>http://www.landbigfish.com/images/articles/da-windserie4.jpg
Photo courtesy of the Weather Channel</CENTER>

Weather forecasting is hard, and not an exact science. But modern technology does help in preparing for a weekend of fishing. If it looks good, go fishing.

But keep an eye to the sky and an ear on the radio because your safety on the water is more important than catching a fish.

Good Fishing,
Capt. Dave Adams

Dave Adams

http://www.landbigfish.com/images/profiles/DaveAdams.jpg Dave Adams is a member of the Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers Association. He is a Licensed U.S.C.G. Master and has over 20 Years experience fishing on Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. One of the best things Dave says about fishing is "I enjoy fishing for the great experience of good company and memories that last a lifetime".

Writing credits:Pennsylvania Angler and Boater, Pennsylvania Game & Fish, Ohio Game & Fish, Great Lakes Angler, Fishing Facts, Ohio Valley Outdoors, PA Hunting & Fishing News, Outdoor Times, Lake Erie Walleye, Ohio Fishing & Hunting News, Valley News Dispatch, Outdoor Times, Outdoor Territory, and Outdoor Journal

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